Our Treatments & Services

Whether your dental needs are a complete exam and cleaning, a full-mouth restoration, or anything in between, we promise to provide you with exceptional care as we enhance the natural beauty of your smile.  Below are just some of the many procedures and services we regularly provide to our patients – with a gentle touch, and stunning results.  Your smile is our first priority, and we’ll give you something to smile about.

Examination & Diagnosis

During your initial visit to our Lintas Clinic, Dr. Ho Wan Ching or Dr. Cassandra Lim will perform a comprehensive dental exam, including an oral cancer screening, gum disease evaluation, evaluation of existing restorations and evaluation of tooth surfaces for decay. A full oral health history is also taken to ensure that your treatment now and in the future is as accurate and effective as it can be.

Filling of Cavities

When your dentist finds a tooth that has been decayed, your dentist will brief you on the type of fillings available and provide you the choice between an amalgam and a composite filling. With your permission to proceed, your dentist will first remove the decayed area, ensuring that all the decay has been removed by probing and testing the area. Next comes the filling where your dentist will apply the prepared filling material into the cavity which is then cured to harden the material. Your dentist may finish off by trimming and polishing the filling to ensure that you have a comfortable and effective bite.

The types of filling available are:

1. Amalgam Fillings

Amalgam fillings have been in use for over 180 years in the field of dentistry. When the metals in amalgam come together, they form a soft material that can be used to build your tooth back to its original form. After a few minutes, the amalgam begins to harden as the metals integrate together. Although pure mercury is toxic, the mercury found in amalgam fillings is locked inside when the filling hardens and is therefore not harmful. Many studies have shown that dental amalgam is a safe, time-tested filling material.

2. Composite Fillings

Composite fillings are newer than amalgam fillings and are constantly improving. The composite resin is about the consistency of modeling clay. In order for the composite to harden, the dentist shines a bright blue light on it. Through a series of chemical reactions, the composite resin hardens into a very strong material that looks very much like a natural tooth.

Many people prefer to have white fillings because they are less noticeable. We usually recommend amalgam fillings for the back teeth and composite resin fillings for the front teeth. In order to assist you in making an informed decision, here is a short list of seven factors to consider:

1 – Amalgam fillings are stronger than composite fillings
We recommend amalgam fillings on the back teeth because that is where the majority of the forces are when you bite down. Since amalgam is made of various metals, it is a very strong material. Composite resin fillings wear down faster than amalgam fillings and need to be replaced more often.

2 – Composite fillings are more expensive than amalgam fillings
If you’re on a tight budget, amalgam may be your best choice.

3 – Amalgam fillings last longer than composite fillings
I’m sure that with future technological advancements, composite fillings will probably last as long as amalgam fillings someday. But for right now, if you want your filling to last a long time, you should choose amalgam.

4 – Composite fillings are less noticeable than silver amalgam fillings
If you get an amalgam filling on a back tooth, most likely only you and your dentist will notice it. But if you don’t like seeing silver in your mouth at all, then a composite filling is probably the way to go.

5 – Amalgam fillings contain mercury
As I mentioned above, the mercury in the amalgam fillings gets incorporated into the filling. However, amalgam fillings do release extremely small amounts of mercury. The amount of mercury released is less than the amount of mercury you’d get from eating fish, but this does pose a problem for people with a mercury allergy.

6 – Amalgam fillings require the dentist to remove healthy tooth structure
Since amalgam fillings don’t bond to the tooth like composite fillings, the dentist has to make the filling wider at the bottom than it is at the top so that the tooth will hold the filling in place. In order to do this, the dentist usually has to cut away healthy tooth structure. With composite fillings, the dentist can simply remove the decay and then place the filling without cutting away healthy tooth structure to retain the filling.

7 – Composite fillings shrink when they harden
Most composite fillings get somewhere between 2-5% smaller when they harden. Sometimes this can lead to gaps between the filling and the tooth which allow bacteria to enter and start a new cavity. Other times, when a large composite filling shrinks as it hardens, it can put stress on the tooth which results in increased sensitivity of the affected tooth. The effect of the shrinkage can be minimized if the dentist adds the composite in small, incremental layers.

Gum Treatment (Scaling)

Scaling and root planing is the most common and conservative form of treatment for periodontal (gum) disease. Scaling is the removal of calculus (commonly called tartar) and plaque that attach to the tooth surfaces. The process especially targets the area below the gum line, along the root. Plaque is a sticky substance, full of bacteria, that forms on teeth. When plaque hardens over time, it is called calculus.

Plaque is more likely to stick to rough surfaces. For this reason, the root surface is made smooth in a process called root planing. Root planing removes any remaining calculus and smooths irregular areas of the root surface.

Typically, ultrasonic instruments are used first to remove large deposits of plaque and calculus from the crowns and roots of the teeth. Hand instruments called scalers and curettes are then used to remove any remaining material and make sure that the tooth surface is clean and smooth. When working under the gum line, your dentist or hygienist cannot see the plaque or calculus. He or she will rely on the sense of touch to feel for roughness on the root surface.

Mild bleeding during the scaling process is normal and to be expected. For two to three days after the treatment, you may have some soreness and be sensitive to hot and cold temperatures. Over-the-counter pain relievers can help but the sensitivity should go away soon after.

Tooth Extraction

Tooth extraction is one of the most dreaded dental procedures even though it is done under anesthetic and entirely painless (aside from the application of the anesthetic itself).

There are many reasons why a tooth extraction may be necessary. Sometimes, the tooth is damaged beyond repair with extensive decay causing constant excruciating pain. If a tooth is positioned wrongly, such as a wisdom tooth growing horizontal (called an impacted tooth) it causes frequent pain and disrupts the positioning of all the other teeth. Another circumstance is when planning for orthodontics, tooth extraction may be necessary to ensure that there is enough room to manuever the teeth to ensure that they are aligned.

There are two types of tooth extractions:

Simple Extractions: These are performed on teeth that are visible in the mouth. General dentists commonly do simple extractions, and most are usually done under a local anesthetic.

Surgical Extractions: These involve teeth that cannot easily be seen or reached in the mouth, either because they have broken off at the gum line or they have not fully erupted. Performed by dentists or oral surgeons, surgical extractions require some type of surgical procedure, such as bone removal, removing and/or lifting and folding back all or part of the gum tissue to expose the tooth, or breaking the tooth into pieces (called tooth sectioning). Surgical extractions can be done with local anesthesia and/or conscious sedation. Patients with special medical conditions and young children may receive general anesthesia.

Root Canal Treatment (RCT)

A root canal is a treatment used to repair and save a tooth that is badly decayed or becomes infected. During a root canal procedure, the nerve and pulp are removed and the inside of the tooth is cleaned and sealed. Without treatment, the tissue surrounding the tooth will become infected and abscesses may form.

"Root canal" is the term used to describe the natural cavity within the center of the tooth. The pulp or pulp chamber is the soft area within the root canal. The tooth's nerve lies within the root canal.

A tooth's nerve is not vitally important to a tooth's health and function after the tooth has emerged through the gums. Its only function is sensory -- to provide the sensation of hot or cold. The presence or absence of a nerve will not affect the day-to-day functioning of the tooth.

Crowns & Bridges

Both crowns and most bridges are fixed prosthetic devices. Unlike removable devices such as dentures, which you can take out and clean daily, crowns and bridges are cemented onto existing teeth or implants, and can only be removed by a dentist.

A crown is used to entirely cover or "cap" a damaged tooth. Besides strengthening a damaged tooth, a crown can be used to improve its appearance, shape or alignment. A crown can also be placed on top of an implant to provide a tooth-like shape and structure for function. Porcelain or ceramic crowns can be matched to the color of your natural teeth. Your dentist may recommend a crown to:

  • Replace a large filling when there isn't enough tooth remaining
  • Protect a weak tooth from fracturing
  • Restore a fractured tooth
  • Attach a bridge
  • Cover a dental implant
  • Cover a discolored or poorly shaped tooth
  • Cover a tooth that has had root canal treatment

Bridges are commonly used to replace one or more missing teeth. They span the space where the teeth are missing. Bridges are cemented to the natural teeth or implants surrounding the empty space. These teeth, called abutments, serve as anchors for the bridge. A replacement tooth, called a pontic, is attached to the crowns that cover the abutments.

While crowns and bridges can last a lifetime, they do sometimes come loose or fall out. The most important step you can take to ensure the longevity of your crown or bridge is to practice good oral hygiene. A bridge can lose its support if the teeth or bone holding it in place are damaged by dental disease. Keep your gums and teeth healthy by Brushing with fluoride toothpaste twice a day and flossing daily. Also see your dentist and hygienist regularly for checkups and professional cleanings. To prevent damage to your new crown or bridge, avoid chewing hard foods, ice or other hard objects.

Dentures

A denture is a removable replacement for missing teeth and surrounding tissues and also known as false teeth (Gigi Palsu). Two types of dentures are available -- complete and partial dentures. Complete dentures are used when all the teeth are missing, while partial dentures are used when some natural teeth remain.

A removable partial denture or bridge usually consists of replacement teeth attached to a pink or gum-colored plastic base, which is sometimes connected by metal framework that holds the denture in place in the mouth. Partial dentures are used when one or more natural teeth remain in the upper or lower jaw. Not only does a partial denture fill in the spaces created by missing teeth, it prevents other teeth from changing position. Partial dentures can either be made from acrylic, cast metal or flexible resin.

Other Treatments Available

We also offer a few other treatments :

  • Tooth Whitening
  • Construction of night guard and sports guard
  • Preventative treatment for children